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How to Name Your Dog

Finding just the right name for your dog or puppy can be tough. If you have reached the naming step, that probably means you have a new dog

There are thousands of potential dog names out there. Take some time to narrow down your choices.

  • Choose a name that you truly like. You will be using it all the time, so you should enjoy the sound of it.
  • Pick a one to two-syllable name. Longer names can be difficult for your dog to understand and a hassle for you to say over and over.
  • Try out the new name for a few days and see how your dog responds.
  • Avoid choosing a name that sounds like a command you plan to teach your dog. It would be confusing to teach “Fletch” to fetch or to train the stay command to “Shae.”
  • Try not to pick a complicated name like Sir Fluffy Von Wagglestein unless you plan to actually use a simplified call name like “Sir Fluffy.”
    Avoid changing an adult dog’s name if the dog knows it already. If you must change the name, choose one that sounds similar. “Bailey” can be changed to “Hailey” or “Kaylee,” and “Charlie” can easily become “Harley” or “Farley.”
  • Don’t name your dog something that others may find offensive or embarrassing. This includes potential racial or cultural slurs, general insults, crass slang terms, and anything that has a curse word in it. Do you really want to call out to your dog “Poophead” and have the whole neighborhood hear it? What will your vet’s office call your dog if you name him “Fartface?”

Dog Name Ideas

Consider your dog’s appearance and personality. You can choose a descriptive name like “Dottie” for a Dalmatian, “Shorty” for a Dachshund, or “Happy” for a jovial mutt, but this has been done many times before. On the other hand, it can be cute to pick a name that describes the opposite of your dog, such as “Tiny” for a Mastiff or “Attila” for a little Yorkie.

You might get the idea for a name because reminds you of a certain place, incident or item. For instance, a dog found as a stray puppy at The Home Depot might be named “Depot.” A dog born or adopted in the spring can be called “Petal” or “Blossom.” A dog might be named “Converse” after a Converse shoe is the first thing the puppy chews up.

Another fun idea, if you like the idea of a theme, is to name your dog (or dogs) after something you enjoy. Wine enthusiasts might consider something like “Merlot” or “Riesling.” Scientists could name their dogs after chemical elements. If you are really into fancy cheeses, you can have dogs named Roquefort, Stilton, and Limburger, and so on.

No matter what you name your dog, make it a name that you like and one that your dog responds well to. As long as you are pleased with the name, who really cares if it’s highly unusual or incredibly popular? After all, your dog doesn’t know the difference.

Comments (1)
January 26, 2020

Awesome post! Keep up the great work! 🙂

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